Guided Math: Chapter 2

Wow! This chapter has a ton of information and it's going to take awhile to process. It's all about creating a classroom environment of numeracy. Most of us do a great job of creating a print-rich environment, but are we numeracy-rich? Is my classroom a place designed for math learning to take place?


After reading about classroom arrangement, I feel pretty confident that I'm doing well there -- since I teach 3rd grade math twice a day and students are at math work stations nearly every day of the year I had to develop a workable arrangement! At the end of the year I worked on my organization and storage of materials, so I think that will be better in the coming year. However, I have a ways to go in creating the numeracy-rich environment described in chapter 2.




Here are some thoughts on topics covered in the book:


Calendars/Agendas: In third grade I've not done a "calendar" time, but reading this chapter has me thinking about ways to incorporate the calendar into routines


Manipulatives: These need to be a little better organized so that students can easily grab what they need.


Problem of the Day: I got away from regular use of this and need to get back to it -- especially with my new math journals.


Word Wall/Vocabulary Displays: I think I did well with this last year. Current vocabulary is put up as we come to it; at the end of a chapter I move it to a wall that displays it for the rest of the year. My vocabulary cards have the word, definition and a representation. I used this great vocabulary foldable from Laura Candler this year, as well as Frayer models.


Math Journals: Number one on my "add to the classroom" list. I loved doing interactive science notebooks this year and want to do the same in math. Guided Math has some excellent suggestions for use.


Graphic Organizers: I tend to use the same few over and over. The book points out that many of the language arts organizers can be adapted for math -- I'm going to try to come up with at least half a dozen to use on a regular basis.


Class-Made Charts: I have NOT been incorporating this. With limited wall space, I will need to come up with a good way to display these.


Okay -- time to stop before I am completely overwhelmed! How about your room? What do you do to create a numeracy-rich environment?


Check out the discussions of the first two chapters:

Chapter 1 by Brenda at Primary Inspired

Chapter 2 by Dana at 3rd Grade Gridiron











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8 comments

  1. Hi Julie,

    I struggle to find space for all the math and literacy anchor charts too. Last year I started doing "pocket posters". Basically the idea is adding page protectors to pocket folders and having students replicate the anchor chart and storing it in their pocket folder. When they need it, its accessible and ready to go. Hope this idea helps!

    Sarah

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    1. Great idea! After taking a break this year, I'm going back to having math folders, so my kids could definitely store them in the folders. Thanks for sharing!

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  2. I find as the year progresses my kiddos become less & less engaged with calendar time. I think ul going to move toward a math focus wall & incorporate a coordinating page for students to work on...perhaps.something they can do in their agendas. Still wrapping my brain around that....

    Primarily Inspired

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    1. I love calendar time, especially at the beginning of the year. My sweets become disinterested it seems as the year progresses. Novelty wearing off perhaps? One idea in chapter 2 that i liked was switching up math warm ups each day. You could keep the strict calendar component (day of the week) and then do a different part of the calendar/math wall each day. That way nothing would become to repetitive.

      Brittany
      Sweet Seconds

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  3. Thanks for linking up!!! And I agree, Ch. 2 had SO much great info!

    Dana

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  4. very informative and interesting. I recently discovered about half of the population are naturally counters...they count steps, ceiling tiles, seconds...and I think the people who do the counting love these charts!
    I am your newest follower..pls follow back if you can.

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  5. Another way to organize all your anchor charts after making them with your kids is to take a picture and place the picture in a dedicated math anchor chart binder.

    Brittany

    Sweet Seconds

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